We came home to 19 degree F weather. Today we have light snow.
The annual maple sugaring is underway. Next week we do ceremony to honor the Maple tree and maple sugaring. Apparently last week marked a good run of sugaring. Here is an explanation of the nature of sugaring.

Rebecca Heisman

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We started tapping maple trees on campus this week. I would guess that most of my readers are familiar with the general process of making maple syrup – you tap the trees to collect their sap and boil it down to get rid of the excess liquid and concentrate the sugar. The Ojibwa Indians in this area were already collecting sap to make syrup and sugar before the first European settlers arrived, and there’s even a town south of here called “Sugar Camp” because the site was known as a center of maple tapping activity. But why do we tap the trees at a specific time of year? What exactly is going on with the sap?

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